Tag Archives: curriculum

How to Deal With Your Teenager

Live and Learn
How to Deal With Your Teenager

by Kru Dokmai, Head Teachers (Thai)

 

I’d like to share what I read about how to deal with teenagers. As many of you know I have 2 children. They are 11 and 6 years old. For the older girl, I imagine it will be easy to deal with her when she is an adult, but it’s not easy at this age (11-12 years old). The way I treated her before doesn’t work anymore!

This article helped me to understand teenagers more, and is helping me learn how to deal with my own pre-teen. As your kids go into their teen years, many things will begin to change. To get along and help your teen develop in a positive direction, you’ll need to change your expectations and develop empathy, all the while establishing boundaries.

Creating a safe, supportive, structured, and loving environment is as important for you as it is for your teen.


Adjusting to Their Independence

1. Treat them like a teen, not a child or adult. Your teen is not a small child anymore, so it’s important to adjust your expectations and not treat them like a child. However, teens are not quite adults and cannot be held responsible as an adult. The teenage brain is in the middle of a critical stage of development, and teens need you to help them through this part of their lives.

2. Be flexible with their freedoms. If your teen is making an effort and showing their responsibility, allow more freedom. If they are making bad choices, be more restrictive. Ultimately, show them that their behavior gives them freedom or restrictions and their own choices determine their outcomes.

3. Focus on trust, not suspicion. It’s true that teens can get into a lot of trouble, but don’t focus your attention on the bad things they’ve done in the past or the risks they might face. If you think your teen may be up to something, have them explain it to you fully. Ask questions instead of jumping to conclusions.

Enforcing rules and consequences

1. Stay calm. If you are angry, take a moment and gather yourself. Take a few deep breaths or walk away and come back when you’re calmer. This way, you’re more likely to give reasonable consequences.

2. Establish boundaries and stick to them. The teen should know what is expected of them. Teens will want to push the boundaries, so remain firm when you set a limit. Discuss these boundaries with your teen, and let them have a say in how they work. They are more likely to follow rules that they helped establish. Put boundaries and rules in writing so that there’s no confusion as to what’s expected of your teen.

3. Enforce consequences. Learning to navigate problem behaviors can be tricky. If you’re too lenient, your teen may think they have no limits or you don’t take their behavior seriously. However, if you’re too strict, your teen may grow to resent you or they may rebel. When your teen breaks a rule, calmly tell them what they did and why they are in trouble. When deciding on a consequence, make sure it’s proportional to the behavior and not given out of anger.

4. Be reasonable. One of the best ways to be reasonable is to listen to your teen’s perspective. When they’re in trouble, ask them what a reasonable consequence might be. Get their input and consider their perspective.

5. Handle conflicts. Sometimes, your teens may want to prove themselves to you or test their independence in your home. Refuse to fight with them. You can avoid major conflicts by monitoring your own reactions to your teen, even if you think they’re being outrageous.

6. Use effective communication. Keep a path of open communication between you whenever possible so they can ask questions, admit mistakes, and reach out when they need help. Instead of jumping to conclusions about your teen’s behavior, ask questions.

Showing Your Love


1. Have fun together. Make sure you find time to enjoy your teen.

2. Develop empathy. Your teen is looking for someone to understand what they’re going through. They generally don’t need you to fix their problems for them (they’ll figure that out for themselves), but they need someone who’ll listen to and empathize with them.

3. Honor and respect your teen. Just as you want your teen to treat you with respect, treat them with respect as well. Constantly yelling at a child can damage their emotions and cause them to feel insecure.

4. Support your teen’s interests. Get them involved in the activities they enjoy and show that you support them. This shows that you care and are invested in their skills and happiness.

5. Open your home to your teenager’s friends. Be a good sport by opening your own home to them. Create a space where they can hang out by themselves but you can casually walk through.

6. Be available to them. Show your love to your teen by being there for them. Not all teens want to talk with their parents, but let them know you’re willing to listen.

Enjoy quality time with your teenager!

Source: The article was co-authored by Paul Chernyak, LPC. Paul Chernyak is a Licensed Professional Counselor in Chicago. He graduated from the American School of Professional Psychology in 2011.

 

Invitation To Parents

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Tea with teachers, Friday 6 June

We would like to invite all our parents for an informal get-together with your child’s teacher next week. Get to know our teachers, our curriculum and learning plans for your child over light refreshments.

Where: Your child’s classroom
Time: Nursery/Kindergarten 15:00 to 15:30; Primary (Prathomsuksa) 15:30 to 16:15

Ajahn Vajiramedhi Visit

Ajahn Vajiramedhi with staff of Panyaden School Chiang Mai

The school was honoured by a visit from well–known monk Venerable Ajahn Vajiramedhi yesterday. Venerable Vajiramedhi has an interest in children’s education and currently supports many schools. He was particularly interested to know how we integrate Buddhist values and green living with our curriculum.

Ajahn Vajiramedhi visits green Panyaden School in Chiang Mai  Ajahn Vajiramedhi visits Buddhist school in CHiang Mai, Panyaden School

Welcome Note From Panyaden School Director, Neil Amas

Welcome to our new school year 2012

Welcome to the second ever year of Panyaden School Chiang Mai!

We are now in our second week and things are going pretty well. There were a few tears in the first week from our little ones but these are beginning to fade away as they integrate into their new surroundings.

We have almost doubled the number of students we had this time last, so we have a livelier school and a number of new teachers, which is great. However our class sizes remain small, which is wonderful for the children. Our student population is really mixed, literally about 50/50 English and Thai first language speakers, so we are very much a bilingual school, both in the classroom and in the playground which is where our students really learn to speak two languages. We spent the hot Chiang Mai summer break training and planning the curriculum so we are raring to go!

We are always trying to improve our school. Specifically, we are looking to tackle some of the common concerns of parents last year.  A number of parents who find it difficult to pick up their children at the regular times have asked if we can provide daily after school care, so we will offer an after school care service this term each day until 4.45pm. Many parents came to us with concerns about lost belongings last year, so we have asked our teachers to pay particular attention to this issue this term and our parents to make sure they label all of their child’s belongings. Paint on clothes has been another common complaint so we changed the school uniform for a darker colour and have asked all out students to bring in a painting shirt and our Art teacher to keep the Art room tidy!  No doubt there will more problems to fix this year and we look forward to working together to solve them.

We  are all looking forward to our second ever school year.

Panyaden School morning assembly Native English speaking teacher with mixed group of students at Panyaden, bilingual school in Chiang Mai Panyaden School's expat students in class. We are a Thai-Eng bilingual international school in Chiang Mai.

Afternoon Tea

Panyaden School welcomed parents to an informal get together this afternoon. Mums, dads, teachers and students shared tea and our special Austrian recipe ‘apple strudel’. It was a chance for parents to get to know their children’s teachers, chat about student activities, classroom rules and expectations and curriculum.

Our School Curriculum: IPC

Learning at Panyaden:

The International Primary Curriculum

by Michel Thibeault, Head Teacher

Panyaden School will be basing its curriculum on the highly regarded International Primary Curriculum (IPC). Acclaimed by teachers across the world, IPC was originally established in the UK and is now taught in more than 1,000 primary schools in 66 countries, including Bangkok Patana School. As the IPC’s academic standard is amongst the highest internationally, the programme answers the worry of many parents as to whether their children will be able to switch seamlessly to any other school around the country or even the world should the need arise.

Similar in approach to the International Baccalaureate, IPC focuses on learning that is student-centred, can be tailored to the needs of individual students and that encourages enquiring minds and independent thinking. IPC has been developed based on the latest research on the brain, on emotions in learning and memory and learning styles. It integrates subjects and topics so that, for example, a week-long project on ‘ weather’ might  incorporate learning in maths, science, language, geography, art or any other subject. For these reasons we have chosen to base our curriculum on the IPC.

Michel Thibeault Conducting IPC Training At Panyaden School
Taan Ajahn Jayasaro, Panyaden School’s Spiritual Advisor

At Panyaden, the teachers’ role is to facilitate learning in their classroom, to enable students to discover things for themselves. We put emphasis on their acquiring of concepts and skills that can be transferred to other subjects and areas of life. The IPC programme was designed on those principles. It nurtures a love of learning and encourages the necessary key skills and personal qualities. Its rigorously planned units of work inspire the learner and provide hands-on activities.  This is aligned with the Panyaden approach to education as described by our spiritual advisor, Ajahn Jayasaro: “the emphasis of Buddhist education is on teaching children how to learn, how to enjoy learning, to love wisdom for its own sake.”

The following chart highlights the main features of IPC, a true 21st century curriculum.

Adapting IPC to Panyaden School

Panyaden’s curriculum, while based on IPC, will also meet the requirements and standards of the national Thai curriculum. Thai culture and history will be taught alongside international themes by merging the key aspects of both curricula. Daily ‘Life Studies’ will reflect our Buddhist approach and environmental mindfulness.

Adapting our own curriculum through picking the best from the IPC and Thai curricula and embedding Panyaden values throughout provides our students with the best possible education. It is an education based on Buddhist principles integrated with a modern, academically competitive curriculum and which provides perspectives that are both international and local.

For prospective parents who would like to know more about IPC and learning at Panyaden, please contact us and we will be happy to arrange a meeting with our Head Teacher, Michel Thibeault.