Tag Archives: compassion

‘Caga’ (Being Generous)

Kindergarten 3 students acting out a skit about typhoon tragedy in The Philippines, Panyaden School
This morning, our K3 students raised awareness in the school about the tragedy of the typhoon that devastated the Philippines and left people without homes, food or drink. In their skit they asked their friends to imagine what it must be like to have no shelter, food, water or family. We will be doing fundraising activities raising over the next couple of weeks to show the importance of compassion and giving to people in need.

Panyaden 12 wise habits: Chanda

Doing your best in the present moment

by Neil Amas, Panyaden School Director


Students are practicing chanda (pronounced chan-ta), or enthusiasm/positive desire (ความยินดีในกิจที่ทำ (ฉันทะ) during these two weeks. Here is some further information on chanda that you may feel useful.

There is a common misunderstanding that in Buddhism all desire is ‘bad’ and leads to suffering. In fact the Buddha recognised that there are 2 different kinds of desire. One is desire borne of ignorance, an unwholesome or negative desire (tanha) which gives rise to suffering. The second is wholesome, skilful desire, or chanda, which originates from a clear understanding of the way things are. It means bringing up motivation or desire to do the very best that you can in the present moment.

As explained by Venerable Ajahn Jayasaro during a talk at Panyaden last year, this is an important principle in the education of children or in the raising of children by parents. We should not be overly obsessed with results, but, rather, look for quality of action in the present moment. There will be disappointments and things will not always work out how we want. There will be outside influences that you cannot control, so the best you can do is put effort into things that you can. This is right motivation. Ven. Jayasaro explained, ‘An over emphasis on results in the future tends to have a number of negative consequences in the present, such as anxiety, restlessness, boredom and dissatisfaction. Or this very easily can lead to dishonesty because if you feel that something you do in the present is merely a means to get what you want in the future, the temptation to take short cuts becomes very strong.’

As parents and teachers we all want our children to be healthy and happy. But if this desire is not wise it may lead to us becoming overly protective causing our children to become too dependent on us, or we may become over-controlling and create alienation and rebellion in our children.

In the classroom, as well as at home, chanda means encouraging our children to be enthusiastic in developing their own learning and knowledge, to try hard to succeed no matter the consequences and to maintain and create good behaviour. We can encourage them to focus on what interests them and help them reflect on how it feels when they put good effort into achieving something, thus helping them to generate further motivation.

Chanda arises from compassion and unconditional love. A sister who helps her younger brother get dressed for school purely out of love and a desire to help him has chanda. A group of students who are enthusiastic about learning a new subject at school solely from their love of learning and desire to work hard at it regardless of the results, are displaying chanda.

We all know how precious a parent’s praise is to a child. If we concentrate on praising effort, we will help them develop chanda, a wise habit for life.

Making of A Buddha Image

Panyaden Photo by Ally Taylor

พระปัญญานุภาพไชยมงคล

Phra Panya Nu Phap Chaiyamongkol

Auspicious Victory Through The Power Of Wisdom


This is the name given to the Buddha image that is currently being created for Panyaden School through the collaboration of two Thai artists. It captures the essence of the school’s belief in helping its students develop and apply wisdom in their lives.

The materials uTook & Thana Photo by Ally Taylorsed for the Buddha statue are bamboo and earth mixed with rice husks – the same natural materials that compose the walls, floors and roofs of Panyaden School.The inspiration for this sculpture came from a smaller Buddha image made by Thai artist, Metta Sudsawad (Took). The main sculpturing is done by Chiang Mai artist Thana Chaiyasien. Khun Took is overseeing this important undertaking. She is also instrumental in crafting the details that will make the image come alive.

The Making Of A Buddha Image

We follow the journey of our main Buddha statue as it begins its life on paper as a 5-foot tall drawing made by Pi Took (white Buddha in the main photo above).

Buddha image skeleton Photo by Ally Taylor

 

Pi Thana first creates the skeleton from bamboo pieces which he enhances with rope and holds everything in place by wooden dowels. 3 days later, he starts to flesh out the body with a mixture of earth, rice husks and water. A week later, we join Pi Took as she examines and works out any changes with Pi Thana. Once she is happy with the structure and proportion of the main body, she will start working each day to finesse the little details that are so important in creating the right posture, attitude and feeling that this Buddha image will evoke. It is refreshing to see the two artists quietly working together to create a statue that will embody Buddha’s wisdom and compassion.

Buddha Photo by Ally Taylor

 

I ask Pi Took if her vision for the statue is based on any specific Thai tradition of Buddha art. “I would say it’s a contemporary style, closer to the Rattanakosin School which makes the Buddha image more realistic and closer to human anatomy and features. However, instead of a flame at the top of the head, I will sculpt a hollow lotus bud, which I think is a softer and more peaceful symbol. Ajahn Jayasaro will place a Buddha relic in the bud during the installation ceremony at Panyaden School.”

The Buddha statue has its right hand, palm down, touching the earth in the Bhumisparsha Mudra (ปางมารวิชัย, pang maa ra wi chai or ‘Calling the Earth to Witness’) gesture (mudra). It is believed that Shakyamuni (before he became Buddha) touched the earth, calling out to the Goddess of the Earth, Sthavara, to testify to his purity.

 

The left hand, held flat in the lap in the dhyana (meditation) mudra, personifies “the union of method and wisdom, samasara and nirvana, and also the realisations of the conventional and ultimate truths” (https://www.lotussculpture.com/mudras.htm). The Bhumisparsha Mudra therefore symbolises Buddha’s victory over Mara, the demon that embodies “the Tempter, the forces of greed, hatred and delusion” (https://www.chiangmai-chiangrai.com/buddhist_ceremonies_1.html).

After the torso and refining of the fingers, hands, feet and robe of the statue comes the difficult task of crafting the face.  Pi Took feels that when most people look at a Buddha image, they tend to look at the face first. This is why she wants to spend enough time mindfully crafting it.

“The Mind Is Everything. What You Think You Become.” – Buddha

Working on the statue is almost like meditating. “It’s like communicating with Buddha. I talk to him and it seems like he is talking back to me! I feel close to Dhamma. This helps me become aware of my emotions. I need to clear my mind because I have to focus and put positive energy into it or the statue will not come out right.”

Panyaden Buddha photo and Took by Ally Taylor Ajahn Decha, Bamboo Master Builder of Chiangmai Life Construction looking at Buddha
Buddha Photo by Ally Taylor for Panyaden School, bilingual school in Chiang Mai

 

Further reading about different styles of Buddha images and the meaning of their gestures/positions:
https://www.lotussculpture.com/mudras.htm
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iconography_of_Gautama_Buddha_in_Laos_and_Thailand
https://www.buddhanet.net/e-learning/history/buddhist-art/flash/thaiart-flash.html