Open House Day Update:


You Are Cordially Invited To Our

Kindergarten School’s Open House Day!

Come by to meet our team! Take a tour around the first Nursery/ Kindergarten School, the Parents’ Sala and the Big Assembly Hall.

Talk to our Principal, Kru Maggie, and the teachers about the type of education you can expect for your child.

  • Day: 28 November 2010
  • Time: From 9am to 1.30pm (lunch buffet at 12pm)
  • Location: Panyaden School (see map below)

Recruiting Native English-Speaking Teachers

Love teaching? Interested in being part of our team at Panyaden School?

We are recruiting native English-speaking Teachers to work fulltime at our School. Read on!

Job Requirements:

  1. Teach assigned subject and perform class teacher duties together with Thai teachers
  2. Plan, prepare and deliver instructional activities
  3. Keep up to date with developments in subject area
  4. Perform student support, counseling students with academic problems and encouraging all students in their work
  5. Communicate necessary information regularly to students, colleagues and parents

Qualifications: We recognize all major full-time TESOL/TEFL courses including

  • Chiang Mai University TEFL
  • Chichester College TESOL (TEFL/TESL)
  • SEE TEFL

Working Hours: Monday – Friday, 07:30 – 16:00 hrs

Contact: pam@panyaden.ac.th

Job Details:

Student & Classroom Duties:
  1. Teach assigned subject and perform class teacher duties together with Thai teachers.
  2. Plan, prepare and deliver instructional activities that facilitate active learning and to meet the varying needs of students in the following subjects: English, Science and Mathematics.
  3. Participate in extracurricular activities such as social activities, sporting activities, clubs and student organizations.
  4. Prepare and set tests, examination papers, and exercises in the responsible subject.
  5. Prepare classroom for class activities and make an after-class record of content, teaching process and interaction in class.
  6. Keep up to date with developments in subject area, teaching resources, learning materials and methods.  Make relevant changes to instructional plans and activities.
  7. Instruct and monitor students in the use of learning materials and equipment.
  8. Perform student support, counseling students with academic problems and encouraging students.
  9. Observe and evaluate student’s performance and development and prepare required report on students and activities.
  10. Communicate necessary information regularly to students, colleagues and parents regarding student progress and student needs.
Administration Duties:
  1. Maintain discipline in accordance with the rules and disciplinary systems of the school.
  2. Have knowledge of, and practice standard health care precautions.
  3. Participate in department/school meetings and parent meetings.
  4. Update all necessary records and documents accurately and completely as required by laws, district policies and school regulations.
  5. Be available for professional development when appropriate and/or when requested by supervisor.
  6. Organize and participate in social and cultural activities such as sports competitions, schools parties, dinners, excursions and pricing events appropriately.
  7. Participate in marketing events for the school.
  8. Co-operate in basic administration work such as keeping student registers and attendance records for starters and leavers.

A green school leads the way in reducing carbon emissions

Ecological footprint, carbon footprint, reduce your carbon emissions. Yes, you’ve heard it all before: about how we should reduce our various ‘footprints’ because we are hurting the environment, how each individual step can tip the ecological scale.

They are all true but hear me out before you roll your eyes at yet another ‘green’ lecture. Reducing your ‘carbon footprint’ is not about following a trend, conforming to a marketable buzzword, earning credits or about shouting out what you are doing to the whole world. It is simply about taking steps to balance out what you take from nature and your environment, and how you can respectfully return that favour.

In The Beginning. William Rees first used the phrase ‘ecological footprint’ in 1992 to describe the weight of what we take from the land and its ability to continue providing those resources. He talked about the “total area of land that is required to sustain its urban region” (Environment and Urbanization, https://eau.sagepub.com/content/4/2/121). This area is the land’s ‘ecological footprint’.

Somewhere along the line, the phrase became ‘carbon footprint’ which is a subset of the ecological footprint. It specifically refers to measuring the amount of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases we release (in a year) to sustain our daily activities and how this weighs on our environment.

Calculating the size of our carbon footprint is a tool that tells us which steps of our activities discharge a large amount of greenhouse gases (GHG) so that we can find ways to reduce that emission.

Primary Footprint. This is a measure of our direct emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and GHG from the burning of fossil fuels including domestic energy consumption and transportation (e.g. cars and buses). We have direct control of these.

Secondary Footprint. This measures the indirect CO2 and GHG emissions (embedded carbon) from the whole life cycle of products (manufacture, material & product transportation, installation etc) such as electricity and household appliances that we use in daily life. We may not have direct control of these.

Panyaden School’s Footprint. Panyaden School is diligently committed to keeping both its primary and secondary footprints small by reducing its greenhouse gas emissions. Together with Chiangmai Life Construction (CLC) and Utility Business Alliances (UBA), this green school is first assessing how much CO2 is produced from the time the first piece of bamboo (or any building material) is trucked to the construction factory to the end of the construction of each sala or building.

For example,

1 ton of clay has 0.0029 tons* of embedded carbon (tCO2 or tons of carbon dioxide released to make a kilogram of clay) + carbon emissions from transporting this clay to the construction site = x ton of CO2 (size of footprint).

By contrast, the process of making concrete generates a lot more carbon dioxide. 1 ton of concrete emits approximately 0.7 to 1 ton of embedded CO2. Add this to the transportation emissions and you understand why the ecological footprint of clay is only a fraction of this.

After this initial round of calculations, the School also plans to collect and analyze data including staff and school activities, the type/number of pieces of furniture used along with the amount of electricity spent for its operations.

While collecting the necessary construction data, the School is also actively trying to keep its CO2 emissions low. This is part of its responsibility to the community and to the environment. It also aims to educate its schoolchildren about environmental management such as how to reduce and recycle waste and how to conserve electricity.

Keeping It Low. What are the steps Panyaden School is taking to minimize and offset its carbon emissions?

1 Building Materials. The School maintains a small carbon footprint by choosing to build its infrastructures with natural materials like bamboo, stone and earth. Cement, concrete and steel rods are only used for foundations and support where appropriate.

When the structures’ rammed earth and adobe walls are demolished at the end of their life cycle, the earth will be returned to the soil and can be recycled again and again. This may be a long time coming but it is necessary to plan ahead and minimize any negative consequences of our current actions on the future of the natural world, our future.

2 Energy and electricity use. Panyaden’s decision to use natural building materials also goes a long way in conserving electricity. The rammed earth walls and floors, free-form adobe walls and bamboo structures are great for ventilation. The earth walls are excellent at absorbing heat during the day and keeping the rooms cool. There is no need for air-conditioning except in rooms that have computers.

3 Transportation. Carbon footprint data include modes of transportation and the distance between the source of supply and the construction site; how many trips and how much diesel and/or petrol are used. As an approximation, 100 litres of diesel produces about 312 kg* of CO2. Shorter and fewer trips via trucks = less diesel burned = less carbon released.

Efficient planning is needed to minimize travel and where possible, materials like earth are ‘harvested’ from the school grounds or sourced locally in Chiang Mai. The construction factory, CLC, is also located only about 2.7 km from the School – another saving on the amount and cost of fuel expended to transport building materials to the site.

4 Waste generation. Any waste on the construction site is recycled where possible. Leftover bamboo, for example, can be re-used as wooden nails (dowels), water mugs and scaffolds. Ground water from the site itself is pumped via simple pipes and used for various building work processes.

Chiangmai Life Construction bamboo worker at Panyaden, English school in Chiang Mai

The teachers will also educate the children to be mindful about food and water usage. Any waste will be treated and recycled with low-energy waste management devices like the Food Waste Digester and Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Food waste: UBA estimates that 450 children and teachers (1 meal a day) may produce about 70 to 80kg of organic waste. The Food Waste Digester installed outside the kitchen/dining hall will recycle the waste into biogas (a renewable energy from organic mass) for cooking. The remaining solid waste from the Digester will be used as organic fertilizer (see post on the FWD).

Wastewater: Each person at the School may generate approximately 60 litres of wastewater per day. This liquid waste can be easily treated by the Wastewater Treatment Plant and safely drained into the natural waterways (see post on the WWT Plant). Per litre of wastewater that has been properly treated emits only 0.0012 kg of CO2 .

5 Plants. Aside from aesthetics, planting bamboo and other trees around the school is a great way to absorb carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and to release oxygen into the atmosphere.

Bamboo to be planted by Chiangmai Life Construction at Panyaden

6 Staff/school activities and transportation. Simple but efficient methods of further reducing its carbon footprint will be encouraged when the school is in full operation. These include recycling office and classroom paper, newspapers, drink containers, unplugging appliances when not using them, turning out lights when leaving a room and carpooling.

Cause And Effect. Panyaden School is mindful that every decision it makes will have an impact on its staff, its schoolchildren, the community and the environment. With this knowledge comes the need and the capacity to act responsibly.

Learning about the size of its carbon footprint is another way to help the School do what it can to manage all its resources and activities in sensible and respectful ways that ease and offset some of the burden we place daily on nature to absorb our carbon emissions. This alleviation is a step towards nurturing a healthy balance and harmony with the environment in which we live.

*Thai Greenhouse Gas Organization (TGO) Guidelines

Acknowledgment:
With thanks to K. Alisa (UBA)

Other sources:
https://timeforchange.org
https://www.footprintnetwork.org
https://greenliving.lovetoknow.com
https://www.carbonfootprintconstruction.co.uk

Panyaden at Central Airport Plaza, Chiang Mai


An Invitation To Parents

You are cordially invited to visit our booth at the Central Airport Plaza in Chiang Mai from 1 October to 30 December 2010, 11am to 7pm daily.
Meet our teachers and find out more about the school curriculum and the fees. We will also have fun activities like traditional palm leaf weaving for children on weekends.
We look forward to seeing you!

Biogas Through Food Waste Management

Renewable Energy:

From Food Scraps to Natural Cooking Gas – Biogas

Everyone, meet the Food Waste Digester. Installing this anaerobic digester is another initiative by this green school to recycle any food scraps and organic waste generated at Panyaden.

The environmental engineers at Utility Business Alliances (UBA) estimate that on average, 450 children and teachers (1 meal a day) will produce about 70 to 80kg of organic waste.

Instead of throwing that away and leaving it to be trucked to a landfill where it will decompose and rot with other materials to release greenhouse gases like methane into the environment, Panyaden School uses the food digester to turn the waste into biogas.

 

What is a Food Waste Digester?

The Food Waste Digester (FWD) is a tank in which bacteria digest and break down organic matter without using oxygen. Watch the YouTube video at the start of this post (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=but5ntRMQQc&feature=player_embedded). It demonstrates a simplified version of how an anaerobic digester like the FWD generally works to produce biogas, a clean natural gas that represents renewable energy.

Food waste that can easily go into the FWD are

  • Cooked and raw meat/fish
  • Cooked and wasted vegetables
  • Fruit waste
  • Cooked pasta/rice
  • Pig/cow manure
  • Other organic wastes

Benefits

For minimal labour input, biogas can replace firewood and fossil fuels that are becoming more expensive as supply lags behind demand (source: University of Adelaide, https://www.adelaide.edu.au/biogas). At Panyaden School, the biogas will be sent from the tank to the gas stove for cooking. Here’s some math that might help put things into perspective (approximations only):

80kg of food waste per day = approx. 2.5 m3 of biogas = 90min of cooking time

Another benefit of using the FWD is that the residual digested food waste (‘digestate’) that is routed to the sludge drying beds, can be recycled as organic fertilizer for planting.

There is no need to worry that using a food digester will attract vermin. It will not because the food waste is broken down under the ground. The FWD is also designed with fibre-reinforced plastic that keeps in odors that attract vermin.

The children at the School will also be able to learn from an early age, the science and application of fermentation, digestion, natural gases, renewable energy and of course, sensible waste management.

Note: Methane is not toxic when inhaled, but it can produce suffocation by reducing the concentration of oxygen inhaled (K. Alisa from UBA). When structures are built on or near landfills, methane can penetrate the buildings’ interiors and expose occupants to significant levels of methane, posing a high risk of causing asphyxiation (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Methane).

Waste Water Management for a Green School

“Water, water, everywhere,

Nor any drop to drink.”

– The Rime of the Ancient Mariner by Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Although Coleridge was writing about being surrounded by seawater that is unfit for consumption,
we may face the same ‘undrinkable’ scenario if we do not save our water resources or protect them
from contamination.

We apparently consume and generate an average of 10 billion pounds of solid and liquid waste each day. If we do not dispose of this waste responsibly, we could create environmental pollution that is hazardous to both humans and nature.

Waste water treatment
I wish there is a better way of naming this process but it is what it is – an efficient way of removing contaminants from liquid waste and safely discharging or reusing the resulting effluent and sludge.

Besides using natural materials for its construction, Panyaden School treats waste water as part of its ‘green mindfulness’  to save water to reduce its ecological footprint. The students gain firsthand knowledge of water conservation and responsible wastewater management.

How waste water is treated at Panyaden School
Have a look at the diagram of the waste water treatment (I’d refer to it as WWT) plant that the school’s construction company, Chiangmai Life Construction has discreetly built at the back of its premises with the help of environmental consultants from Utility Business Alliance (UBA*).

The UBA team from Bangkok has designed the main WWT capsule to be placed safely underground where it will not be an eye sore.

There are 2 basic stages to a standard WWT plant:

Primary Stage: From the Equalization or EQ Tank where it is contained, the wastewater first passes through a physical stage where large, solid garbage is filtered out and separated from the lighter waste such as grease and oils. These will settle to the bottom while the grease and oils rise to the surface.

Secondary Stage: This is the biological stage that can be either anaerobic or aerobic. The UBA team chose the latter type since the organic compound content in the School’s wastewater will not be high. It is also easy to control and operate.

Aerobic treatment: The wastewater is filled with oxygen and ‘good’ micro-organisms, which will decompose the organic waste. Once the water has been treated, it will be separated from the micro-organism afters it goes into the sedimentation tank. The solid waste will be released as bacteria-rich sludge.


After stage 2, the wastewater may still contain some organic compounds, phosphates, nitrates and pathogens. These can be further removed in the third level through a series of chemical and physical processes. However the effluent discharged from Stage 2 (with the proper design and operation) normally passes the effluent standard, hence eliminating the need for further treatment.

How the treated water is used at Panyaden School
The School’s WWT plant treats the water up to the secondary stage. The treated water is safe and clean enough to be discharged into the natural waterways. The bacteria-rich sludge is used as organic fertilizer.

Clean water everywhere
We can all do our part to conserve water and ease the pressure on waste treatment plants in our town, city or state. Pause and think a little before you turn on the tap. Let’s do what we can to ensure we will have enough clean water everywhere in the future, “flowing, ever flowing” (Andrew B. Paterson, poet).

*Utility Business Alliances Co., Ltd. (UBA), https://www.uba.co.th

Established in 2000 by a group of science professionals, the company specializes in water pollution management. It is accepted as one of the leaders in waste and water management treatment in Thailand.

UBA is certified with international qualification standards of ISO9001 and ISO14001 (Environment Management System).

The UBA team for Panyaden School is made up of K. Bordin Udon, K. Piti Julkhananukit, K. Somchat Sanghitkul and K. Alisa Wichichiencharoen. They are working on 3 projects for the School:

  • Designing and building the WWT plant
  • Designing the Food Waste Digester (look out for our next post on this)
  • Measuring the School’s carbon footprint and recommending ways of
    keeping it low

 

 

Panyaden School’s Official Launch

By K. Yodphet Sudsawad (Founder of Panyaden School)

Panyaden School team, international English school in Chiang Mai

The official launch of Panyaden School took place at the Kid’s Learning Expo 2010 at Queen Sirikit National Convention Center in Bangkok from 23 to 25 July 2010. The objective of the exhibition was to introduce our school to the Thai academic world and to spread the news that this unique school project is happening in Chiang Mai. The booth’s decoration was a major eye catch in this event. We imitated the rammed earth walls and the bamboo roofs used at our school by bamboo and earth specialist, Chiangmai Life Construction.

Inside Both with Bamboo

Many children enjoyed participating in the activities conducted by the Panyaden team i.e. weaving palm leaves in animal shapes (‘pla tapian bai lan’), drawing and painting organic forms. The teachers and other staff of Panyaden also enjoyed their time with the children. Just the smiles shining from our little friends who visited the booth made this a cheerful and successful event for all of us. Quite a number of parents were interested in our school concept and the curriculum design. Many plan to come to our Open House in Chiang Mai on 28 November 2010 from 10am to 3pm. Over 100 parents gave us their contact details to keep them updated on the project and are considering sending their children to attend either the summer course or the 2011 academic year, or both, at Panyaden School. We hope to see you all at our road show in Chiang Mai as well as our Open House Day.

Check out the Panyaden School Promo Video on youtube!

“Rather than an education system which is geared to testing and to competition and to preparing people for a particular livelihood, the emphasis of Buddhist education is on teaching children how to learn, how to enjoy learning, to love wisdom for its own sake. It teaches them the emotional maturity enabling them to make use of their knowledge to create a happy life for themselves and their family and to contribute positively to the society in which they live. It in no way compromises on the work of preparing children to make a good livelihood, but it lets them see that life is deeper and richer than working in order to consume.” – On Buddhist Wisdom In Education by Ajahn Jayasaro

This delightful video is out on youtube (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvzWJJ8NeXE) and on our Facebook page. Produced by Phenomena Bangkok.

Panyaden Teachers’ Training


Panyaden School started recruiting and training teachers at its Bangkok office in April 2010.

Criteria for the selection of teachers:

  1. Their attitude towards teaching and towards their own goals
  2. They must love being a teacher and have their ideas how to be a good educator
  3. They need to know themselves and what they are good at so that they can skillfully pass on that knowledge to their students
  4. Their general capacity to reflect on themselves and the world

Recruitment and Training:

Principal of Panyaden Buddhist School
Kru Maggie

Kru Maggie (Trainer) shortlisted possible candidates after she has pored through the resumes/applications received by the Bangkok office. She interviewed each of them before she made a ‘final’ selection of candidates who qualify for a 3-day trial period with her.

Upon passing the trial, the candidates undergo a 3-month training program.

During this time, the potential teachers learn how to meditate and how to use non-verbal communication tools such as music and pictures as new effective means of teaching.

They also learn to understand and deal positively with each student’s unique character in order to bring out the best from him or her.

Next, the potentials are placed in different schools in Bangkok that are similar in their educational approach to Panyaden’s, to gain practical teaching experience.

There are currently 30 candidates undergoing the practical teacher training. They will be further evaluated to see if they will eventually qualify to teach at Panyaden School in March next year (the school’s summer course starts 28 Mar to 6 May; First Term from 16 May – 30 Sept 2011).

The school is still looking for more candidates, both Thai and foreign (native English speaking). If you are interested in being part of Panyaden School, please click https://www.panyaden.ac.th/contact-us

Kru Maggie and Trainee Teachers posing in front of bamboo sala

Ajahn Jayasaro Visits

There is a quiet excitement in the air as we gathered at K. Tik’s house to meet the Venerable Ajahn Jayasaro, the Spiritual Advisor of Panyaden School. He had come to Chiang Mai to visit the school construction site and to give a dhamma talk to the trainee teachers and to the Panyaden School team (foremen, the local liaison Ajahn Sorn, the ‘Bamboo Boss’ Ajahn Decha and many more).

Once we are all seated, Ajahn Jayasaro is given booklets that Kru Maggie (Principal and designer of the school’s curriculum) and the trainee teachers have brought with them after their 2-day nature jaunt in Doi Inthanon. The teachers had written down short poems, sketched or painted their meditations on the connection between life and nature.

Ajahn Jayasaro went through the booklets, smiled and made comments before he began to share his thoughts on education.

In his dhamma talks, Ajahn Jayasaro often states that “Buddhism is not a belief-based religion” but an education-based one which teaches people to “liberate themselves from all suffering through a clear penetrative understanding of the way things are.”

The biggest obstacle to true happiness in life is ignorance. The Buddhist teachings show us how to transcend ignorance. “From then you can see it is a matter of education.”

Ajahn Jayasaro is a well-known advocate of “adapting Buddhist developmental principles to the education process” – one that involves teaching children to develop wise relationships to the physical, social, emotional worlds they inhabit.

“Most importantly, the jewel in the crown of Buddhism is its emphasis on wisdom and the practical technique to develop and to nourish this …A Buddhist approach does not overlook “the traditional features of an educational system but adds on to it…”

“In order to flourish in the world, it’s not then a matter of merely accumulating a body of knowledge, so much as cultivating a strong but supple mind and the ability to develop life skills such as skillful communication, the ability to work in a team, patience, resilience (the ability to bounce back after disappointments), the ability to manage one’s moods, and to protect the mind from pride, arrogance, greed, hatred, depression, anxiety, and panic. These abilities are being increasingly recognized as being more useful and necessary in the long run to a successful working life rather than having a particular degree under your belt.” (Ajahn Jayasaro, “Buddhist Wisdom In Education”, Buddhist Approach, https://www.panyaden.ac.th).

After the talk, Ajahn answered questions from the floor before guiding everyone in meditation. An appropriate ending to an insightful afternoon.

Ajahn Jayasaro and the Panyaden School team